Thursday, October 7, 2010

Artist of the Week - Edward Hopper

Hopper is famous for capturing the mood and feel of the mid-20th century in his paintings. From lonely diners and hotel rooms to houses on the shore, his paintings lend a vision of what life was like in those times.




 Nighthawks is a 1942 painting by Edward Hopper,that portrays people sitting in a downtown diner late at night. It is considered Hopper's most famous painting, as well as one of the most recognizable in American art. It is currently in the collection of the Art Institute of Chicago.

Following are more works by Edward Hopper, in chronological order


Queensboro Bridge
1913


Blackhead, Monhegan
(Maine)
1919

"There will be, I think, an attempt to grasp again the surprise and accidents of nature and a more intimate and sympathetic study of its moods, together with a renewed wonder and humility on the part of such as are still capable of these basic reactions."   ~ Edward Hopper
Chop Suey
 1929
 Always reluctant to discuss himself and his art, Hopper simply summed up his art by stating, 
“The whole answer is there on the canvas."
Freight Car at Truro
(Cape Cod)
1931


Room in New York
1932

"If you could say it i words, there would be no reason to paint."
~ Edward Hopper

Shakespeare at Dusk
(Central Park)
1935


Gas
1940


The Martha McKeen of Wellfleet
(Cape Cod, Massachusetts)
1944

"My aim in painting has always been the most exact transcription possible of my most intimate impression of nature."  ~ Edward Hopper

Sunlight on Brownstones
1956
"In general it can be said that a nation's art is greatest when it most reflects the character of its people."

Intermission
1953

"No amount of skillful invention can replace the essential element of imagination.

1960

"Great art is the outward expression of an inner life in the artist, and this inner life will result in his personal vision of the world."
~ Edward Hopper



Chair Car
1965

"Well, I've always been interested in approaching a big city in a train, and I can't exactly describe the sensations, but they're entirely human and perhaps have nothing to do with aesthetics."

12 comments:

  1. Very interesting. Thank you for sharing Edward Hopper. Some of my favorites.

    ReplyDelete
  2. loved this as he is not one of my favorite artists...i have always felt his art depicted a bleakness, speaking of a time that was darker than perhaps what i prefer...loved that you included his quotes with the works because it gave me more perspective on the human being he was and not just the painting...my favorite has always been chop suey :)
    xox

    ReplyDelete
  3. These are great. A sense of space, timelessness and loneliness (or alone-ness).

    ReplyDelete
  4. Linda - I don't quite get him enough to understand why, if he was interpreting his inner world onto the canvas (one of the quotes), he is called a realist. Does that make sense? Honestly, there are just way too many things I don't know enough about. ;-) Thank you, lovely, as always for your comments and your warmth. Hugs.

    Jerry - I think that it is more that sense of aloneness that I am drawn to in Hopper's paintings, than his actual style.

    Linda (again) Chop Suey is my ab fave! Is it that stunning red? :-)

    ReplyDelete
  5. This was a very interesting post. I liked the quotes you included as well as the art. I think my favorite of the work you included is Intermission. Not sure why but that one captured me.

    ReplyDelete
  6. «Louis» completely enjoyed your Hopper series here!

    Re your question about the location of Grace Cathedral,
    it is on Nob Hill, California at Taylor Streets.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Carver - that's just it with Hopper - one can't exactly say "why". Thanks for commenting!

    Louis - Glad you enjoyed Hopper. Thanks for the info on Grace Church.

    Magiceye - thanks! Glad you came by.

    Love and Peace,
    Gina

    ReplyDelete
  8. The thing I've always found most wonderful about him is that his work transcended the naked realism of photography. This is an excellent overview collection.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hopper got it. What hurt about being alive, and, at the same time, what was beautiful. And how there is no escape.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Love the freight car, love 'Chop Suey', we discussed that I love his use of light. Nothing feels 'glorified', but it does hearken to a simpler time. His paintings evoke the smell of a perfect summer day for me, not just the feel.

    Hope the exhibition is everything it can be.

    ReplyDelete
  11. A very soothing day to start the day. I could feel myself sitting on that train, reading. Thanks for this post.

    ReplyDelete

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