Wednesday, February 24, 2010

Celebrating African-American Artist Barkley Hendricks

There are only a few days left before February, which is Black History month, is over. On The Pagan Sphinx blog, we've celebrated writer and historian Zora Neale Hurston and now it's time for some African-American art. I present you with the fine work of American painter Barkley L. Hendricks.


 Barkley L. Hendricks
1945-

The painter Barkley L. Hendricks caught not only the mood, but also the dress of black Americans in the late 1960s and early 1970s. Indeed, the subhead of the Studio Museum’s exhibition, “Birth of the Cool,” gives the nod to the development of a style whose casual hipness and intimated militancy marked a generation of African Americans read the whole article here


The paintings below were featured in the exhibition Birth of the Cool at Studio Museum
Harlem, New York





11 comments:

  1. Sorry never heard of him, but looking at these paintings, I reckon he's good, I like the life in them

    ReplyDelete
  2. mac: I'd never heard of him either. I was doing a search a few weeks ago for black American painters and came upon his work and I liked it.

    I like what you said - there is life in them. And pride.

    As always, I love your comments. You are straight and true to yourself.

    ReplyDelete
  3. These are extraordinary, Sphinx! Should I say which one i like best - The girl with the bubble gum bubble... Ha! Love it! Join the yard art game and post photos. I think it will be fun! :)

    ReplyDelete
  4. Wicked cool, wicked killer. I'm with Mary, that chick's legs rule this post.

    Great find, Gina. You're my cultural education, always have been.

    ReplyDelete
  5. I like the Afro do, framed nicely by the background arch.

    Peace.

    ReplyDelete
  6. Spadoman: the afro almost looks like a sort of halo around her - like a madonna. I like that about the painting.

    CR: I think that Hendrick's talent rules this post.

    ReplyDelete
  7. I love the rich reds of the coats in the triple image of the man. That is my favorite. Also the stark white of the men's outfits against the dark skin of the nude. Beautiful.

    ReplyDelete
  8. I love these paintings, can't choose a favourite! Never heard of the artist before, thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  9. the last one makes me think of Angela Davis

    I lived in Harlem for s bit during the 70s, his paintings absolutely capture the essence

    ReplyDelete
  10. I do remember coming across the painting of the extreme hair before and liked it then. However, I'd never seen any of the rest which really are excellent. The girl on the couch is wonderful but I think if I could hang one it would be the red coat painting.

    ReplyDelete
  11. JM: I'm glad you liked these! It's good to see you come by!

    Di: Angela Davis - yes! I liked these paintings in large part because they depict the 60's and early 70's that is NOT the mostly-white, hippie-Woodstock crowd. And you're aware of the climate in Harlem, which was really good feedback to get on these works!

    Susan: I love the red coat painting a lot as well.

    ReplyDelete

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